Two choices: The History of Homesteading or The History of the Homestead Act of 1862

 

The History of Homesteading

The Homestead Allure

 

Table of Contents

THEN

The History of Homesteading:

Prior to Homestead Act

Immigration from Europe

Henry David Thoureau’s Walden

Homestead from 1845-1847 on Walden Pond

ARE WE OUT OF LAND?  THE PUSH WEST

East coast too crowded

Native Americans

1861 Civil War began

Homestead Act of 1862:

Abraham Lincoln

Civil war: economics

“Before the Civil War, Northern states had wanted to open up the West to settlement, and they saw homesteads, the transcontinental railroad, and land grant colleges as critical to that process” (NebraskaStudies.org, 2016).

The first Homestead Act Homesteader: Daniel Freeman

1863 began homesteading

1865 Civil War ended Daniel goes to get Agnes and get married

1890 almost all land is gone in American Frontier

1908 died

The who, what, why, when, and how

Homesteading: THEN and NOW

 

Section One: THEN

 

Chapter 1.  Why?  All dressed up with no where to LIVE

civil war economics and no more space north, or east

Chapter 2.  How?  The best things in life ARE always FREE

Homestead Act of 1862

Chapter 3.  Who?  One in OVER a million

Daniel Freeman Patent #1

Chapter 4.  When?  Running out of room

1862 until late 1890’s when most of the land had been absorbed by claims, railroads or other large future corporations.

Chapter 5.  Where?  The Great American LAND Rush

Western Frontier, Nebraska and west

Life on the trail

 

Section Two:  Now  The Revival

 

Chapter 6.  Why?  What was once the past, is now the present

The allure is due to what was once called convientent and comfortable (technology), is becoming too much.  Modern amenities have changed the landscape of life, literally and theoretically

Chapter 7.  How?  UNPLUGGED

the best things in life are NOT EVER free

homesteading is now a choice to live “uncomfortably” but technology has made it much easier than before.  Now it is off-grid living.  Meaning “unplugged” from modern convienences.   It is not free anymore.  In fact, to get started it can cost a ton of money.

Chapter 8.  Who? Only the STRONG survive

It take a specific person or persons to homestead successfully.  Most have had previous experience in everything.  Many want to run away, some like seclusions, all are at some point a MacGyver.

Dick Proenneke’s story

Chapter 9.  When?  Always and Forever

when you can afford it.  Retirement, make a living off what you grow, or work remote online.

Chapter 10.  Where?  And then there were, NONE

Not free.  Anywhere one can find peace, quite, and seclusion.  Very few places, many buy previous pieces of land that were homesteads in the past.

 

 

Dick Proenneke Alone in the Wilderness

Entered Navy right after Pearl Harbor attack

1945 medical discharge from rheumatic  fever

 

MODERN DAY HOMESTEAD

Addition of Technology

Off-grid not homesteading / or are they the same

Tiny house living

Looks different

Eats different

Allure now

Henry David Thoureau’s Walden

 

Works Cited
History and Culture. (2016). Retrieved from National Park Services: https://www.nps.gov/home/learn/historyculture/index.htm

NebraskaStudies.org. (2016). Homestead Act: Who Were the Settlers? : Daniel Freeman and the Homestead Act. Retrieved from Nebraska Studies: http://www.nebraskastudies.org/0500/frameset_reset.html?http://www.nebraskastudies.org/0500/stories/0501_0201.html

Sheldon, A. E. (1913). The First Homestead. Retrieved from Legends of America: http://www.legendsofamerica.com/ne-homestead.html

 

Or

The History of the Homestead Act of 1862

Homesteading: THEN and NOW

Homestead Act of 1862, A Historical Timeline

By Kristine Keller

 

Table of Contents

 

 

Section One: THEN

This section will focus on what the homestead act used to feel and look like.  The why, who, when, how, and where, of past homesteading.

 

Chapter 1.  Why?  All dressed up with nowhere to LIVE

The Civil war brought on a major economic crisis in the United States.  In order to regain control of the economic situation, many decisions were made by the government to help expand into the West.  (United States National Archives, 2016)

The Homestead Act of 1862 was created to help entice people to migrate west.  Historical facts on the Homestead act will be in this chapter, along with narration of Abraham Lincoln’s role.

Sources:

United States National Archives.  (2016). Teaching With Documents:  Retrieved from The U.S. National Archives and Records Administration: https://www.archives.gov/education/lessons/homestead-act/

http://www.civilwartrust.org. (2014).  Civil War Facts.  Retrieved from The Civil War Trust: http://www.civilwar.org/education/history/faq/

Nation Park Service: U.S. Department of Interior.  (2016, May 10).  Abraham Lincoln and the West, Retrieved from National Park Service: U.S. Department of Interior: https://www.nps.gov/home/learn/historyculture/firsthomesteader.htm

 

 

 

 

Chapter 2.  When?  Running out of room

1862 until late 1890 is when most of the land had been absorbed by claims, railroads, or other large future corporations.  Explore the years between 1862 and 1890’s.  What was going on in history in the entire world?

End of chapter, lead into who the homesteaders were at this time.

Sources:

Friggens, P. (1939, January 1).  America’s Greatest Land Boom.  Retrieved from Genealogy Trails: Nebraska: http://genealogytrails.com/neb/americasgreatestlandboom.htm

United States National Archives.  (2016). Teaching With Documents:  Retrieved from The U.S. National Archives and Records Administration: https://www.archives.gov/education/lessons/homestead-act/

Chapter 3.  Who?  One in a million

Daniel Freeman Patent #1.  Discuss and narrate Daniel’s deed signing.  Give details regarding who, why, where, when and how, he became the first homesteader with the Homestead Act of 1862.

Discuss briefly how homesteaders look different in order to give in sight to Chapter 8.

End of Chapter, lead into what a homestead looks and felt like and how people got there.

Sources:

All are listed at the end of chapter sample

 

Chapter 4.  How?  The best things in life ARE always FREE

Getting there, life on the trail.  Narrate a Santa Fe trail story.  Also, discuss what a homestead lifestyle was like.  Hard work and how they made their money.

Sources:

Nation Park Service: U.S. Department of Interior.  (2016, May 10).  Stories.  Retrieved from National Park Service: U.S. Department of Interior: https://www.nps.gov/home/learn/historyculture/firsthomesteader.htm

 

Chapter 5.  Where?  The Great American LAND Rush

Western Frontier, Nebraska and beyond.  Explain how the United States was expanding via war, and the involvement of Native Americans, as well as other countries.

Sources:

Nation Park Service: U.S. Department of Interior.  (2016, May 10).  Great American Land Boom, Retrieved from National Park Service: U.S. Department of Interior: https://www.nps.gov/home/learn/historyculture/firsthomesteader.htm

 

Section Two:  Now The Revival (this section will include more of my voice, and personal stories, in order to compare Then and Now.  The why, who, when, how, and where, of present homesteading.

 

Chapter 6.  Why?  What was once the past, is now the present

The allure is due to what was once called convenient and comfortable (technology), is becoming too much.  Modern amenities have changed the landscape of life, literally and theoretically.

Sources:

Use my personal story and narrate my experience as to why I want to be off-grid.

Also, use the social media surveys that have been taken by me.

Chapter 7.  How?  The new way to live….  UNPLUGGED

Homesteading is now called off-grid living.

homesteading is now a choice to live “uncomfortably” but technology has made it much easier than before.  Now it is off-grid living.  Meaning “unplugged” from modern conveniences.  It is not free anymore.  In fact, to get started it can cost a ton of money.

Sources:

Specific information on what it takes to homestead now.  The cost and how people still work.

 

 

Chapter 8.  Who?  Only the STRONG survive

It takes a specific person or persons to homestead successfully.  Most have had previous experience in everything.  Many want to run away, some like seclusions, all are at some point a MacGyver. Expand on the characteristics a homesteader needs to be successful.

Sources:

Dick Proenneke’s story, use his journals and video.

Why I would be a good homesteader

Use current media

Unplugged nation

Tiny house living

Current trending allure to homesteading

 

Chapter 9.  When?  Always and Forever

When you can afford it.  Retirement, make a living off what you grow, or work remote online.  Expand on why it is a popular current trend.

Sources:

See proposal sources and stories, this is where those will be added.

Chapter 10.  Where?  And then there were, NONE

Not free.  Anywhere one can find peace, quite, and seclusion.  Very few places, many buy previous pieces of land that were homesteads in the past. (Fischer, 2001)

Sources:

Fischer, T. (2001, September 10).  Families Try Homesteading for Spring Frontier House.  Retrieved from Current Magazine: http://current.org/2001/09/families-try-homesteading-for-spring-frontier-house/

Use free-land app

Chapter 10: Conclusion

This last part will be the conclusion and review of the compare and contrast of THEN and NOW of homesteading.

 

 

Works Cited
Fischer, T. (2001, September 10). Families Try Homesteading for Spring Frontier House. Retrieved from Current Magazine: http://current.org/2001/09/families-try-homesteading-for-spring-frontier-house/

Freeman, D. (1864, August 7). Freeman Letters. Retrieved from National Parks Service: U.S. Department of Interior: https://www.nps.gov/home/learn/historyculture/letters.htm

Friggens, P. (1939, January 1). America’s Greatest Land Boom. Retrieved from Genealogy Trails: Nebraska: http://genealogytrails.com/neb/americasgreatestlandboom.htm

Friggens, P. (1939, January 1). Looking Back at America’s Greatest Land Boom . Seattle Daily Times: State of Nebraska – Genealogy Trails.

History and Culture. (2016). Retrieved from National Park Services: https://www.nps.gov/home/learn/historyculture/index.htm

Nation Park Service: U.S. Department of Interior. (2016, May 10). The First Homesteader. Retrieved from National Park Service: U.S. Department of Interior: https://www.nps.gov/home/learn/historyculture/firsthomesteader.htm

NebraskaStudies.org. (2016). Homestead Act: Who Were the Settlers? : Daniel Freeman and the Homestead Act. Retrieved from Nebraska Studies: http://www.nebraskastudies.org/0500/frameset_reset.html?http://www.nebraskastudies.org/0500/stories/0501_0201.html

Rollins, A. (2015, November 15). First Homesteader is Gone, but Legacy Remains . Beatrice Daily Sun. Retrieved from http://beatricedailysun.com/news/local/first-homesteader-is-gone-but-legacy-remains/article_c54ec7c6-ddd2-5be4-a1cb-040356e65c1c.html

Sheldon, A. E. (1913). The First Homestead. Retrieved from Legends of America: http://www.legendsofamerica.com/ne-homestead.html

United States National Archives. (2016). Teaching With Documents:. Retrieved from The U.S. National Archives and Records Administration: https://www.archives.gov/education/lessons/homestead-act/

Vosburgh, H. (2013, February). Fort Leavenworth. Retrieved from Kansas Historical Society: https://www.kshs.org/kansapedia/fort-leavenworth/17810

http://www.civilwar.org. (2016). Medical One. Two Week Cirriculum For Teachign the Civil War, pp. 175-180. Retrieved from Civil War Education: http://www.civilwar.org/education/pdfs/civil-was-curriculum-medicine.pdf

http://www.civilwartrust.org. (2014). Civil War Facts. Retrieved from The Civil War Trust: http://www.civilwar.org/education/history/faq/

http://www.distance-cities.com. (2016). Distance from Fort Leavenworth, KS to Beatrice, NE. Retrieved from Distance Between Cities: http://www.distance-cities.com/distance-fort-leavenworth-ks-to-beatrice-ne

 

 

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